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Today's Dippit!


Quote

“The longer I live, the more beautiful life becomes.”


Frank Lloyd Wright


Joke

A cheese factory exploded in France. Da brie is everywhere!


Fun Fact

The first roller coaster was used to transport coal down a hill. After people found that it could reach speeds up to 50 miles per hour, tourists asked to ride on it for a few cents.


Reading Fact

Fifty Shades of Grey started out as Twilight fan-fiction.


Originally titled Master of the Universe and published episodically on fan-fiction websites, the work featured characters named after Stephanie Meyer’s Bella Swan and Edward Cullen. E. L. James later rewrote the story and extended it into three parts: Fifty Shades of Grey, Fifty Shades Darker, and Fifty Shades Freed.


Fans of Twilight will notice some striking similarities between characters: both Christian and Edward are rich, possessive, and intense, while Anastasia and Bella – clumsy and completely dazzled by their partner. 


History Fact

Augustus Caesar was the wealthiest man to ever live in history.

 

Nephew and heir of Julius Caesar, Roman Emperor Augustus had an estimated net worth of $.46 trillion when counting for inflation.


Movie/TV Trivia

In The NotebookRyan Gosling hated Rachel McAdams so much at first that he tried to get her replaced.


Movie/TV Quote

"That's a bingo."


Inglourious Basterds (2009)


Christoph Waltz's international starmaking turn as Colonel Hans Landa, an SS officer working in Nazi-occupied France, allows him to lay on his weasely, morally bankrupt charm throughout Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds, but he lands on this gem right at the moment World War II can be won by the Allies. While almost all of Waltz's screen time features zingers delivered in three languages, this is the line that reveals how truly empty his soul is: He's smart, and has no conscience. As he presents his offer to Brad Pitt's Aldo Raine and B.J. Novak's Smithson Utivich, the perpetually cheery colonel tries his hand at an American expression. The result is a malapropism that belies the utter seriousness of the moment, and is instantly memorable; the war will be over that night, but Landa happily practices his American English as he preps a clean exit for himself. Even though Aldo corrects him, Landa's version is what lives on from Inglourious Basterds.


Conversation Starter

Have you travelled to any different countries? Which ones?


Writing Prompt

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